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Keeping a road open to vehicles


A Wallowa-Whitman National Forest official’s recent statement that the forest intends to keep the North Powder River Road open to motor vehicles, even if Congress designates new wilderness in that part of the Elkhorn Mountains, was welcome.

That’s a popular route into the Elkhorns and it should remain accessible by motor vehicles.

But the Wallowa-Whitman’s stance is not the definitive word on the matter.


Celebrate clarity on the ballot


Nowhere is clarity in writing more important than on a voter’s ballot.

And so we’re pleased with the Oregon Supreme Court’s decision last week regarding the wording of a ballot measure that Oregonians likely will vote on in November.

The measure has to do with the state’s plan to give four-year driver’s licenses to people who can’t prove their living legally in the U.S.


Extend studded tire season


Nature, as usual, thumbed its frost-nipped nose at calendars, including the Oregon Department of Transportation’s.

On Tuesday, the first day studded tires were illegal on the state’s highways, a snowstorm slickened highways in Central and Southeastern Oregon.

Baker County, fortunately, was spared this storm.

But as anyone knows who has lived here for more than a few years, it’s hardly uncommon for heavy snow to fall in April (and, let’s be honest, in May or, occasionally, in June).


Don’t punish all renters


We don’t like that Baker City had to hire a collection agency to try to recover about $25,000 in unpaid water/sewer bills during the most recent fiscal year.

But we like even less the prospect of forcing many residents — most of whom pay their utility bills on time — to pay higher rents because a relatively handful of renters are irresponsible.

We’re concerned, though, that the latter scenario would result if the City Council goes along with the proposal City Manager Mike Kee unveiled earlier this month.


Walden’s bill has promise


Rep. Greg Walden has gotten right to the heart of the debate over managing national forests, and he only needed to write a four-page bill to do it.

Which must be some sort of record for legislative brevity.

Walden, the lone Republican in Oregon’s congressional delegation, thinks residents ought to have a louder voice when the U.S. Forest Service proposes to restrict motor vehicle use on national forests.


Raises OK, but drop the charts


Baker City Manager Mike Kee’s proposal to give the city’s 16 non-union employees a 1.5 percent pay raise, retroactive to Jan. 1, is reasonable.

That’s comparable to the contracts the City Council approved last year with the city’s three unions. Those deals include annual raises of either 1 percent or 1.5 percent.

Moreover, the non-union staff, which includes department heads, three public works supervisors and three assistant fire chiefs, hasn’t had an across-the-board pay hike since 2011.

The non-union raises would cost the city about $19,000, a modest amount as part of the city’s overall budget, and one that would not require the city to reduce any services.

We were not, however, persuaded that pay raises are needed based on the comparison chart that Kee gave to councilors to bolster his argument.


Paying for a cat fix


We agree with Suzanne Fouty that there are too many feral or otherwise unwanted cats in Baker City.

We also agree with Fouty, who coordinates the Mollie Atwater and Friends Spay/Neuter Program, that an infusion of cash to deal with the problem would improve our quality of life.

But we think there might be a way to achieve that goal without requiring residents to help pay for a project some of them might oppose.


More time for public to chime in


The local group Forest Access for All, which opposes further restrictions on motor vehicle travel on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, contends the Forest Service isn’t giving residents enough time to review a lengthy new document the agency is releasing later this week.

We agree.

The records that constitute the Blue Mountains Forest Plan Revision exceed 1,000 pages.

This is an important document, albeit one that doesn’t propose to close any roads.


In the dark on wolves


So far as is known, Oregon’s newest wolf pack hasn’t attacked any livestock.

But this pack, which apparently consists of five wolves, is in one respect the most worrisome group of wolves in the state.

The reason is that nobody knows where they are.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) hopes to ease that concern, as soon as possible, by netting at least one of the wolves and fitting it with a GPS collar that emits a signal  by which agency officials can track the wolf’s movements and, by extension, the pack’s.

That knowledge is vital in helping ODFW alert livestock owners when wolves are nearby.

We were reminded of this just this week, when an adult male wolf from the Snake River pack wandered west into northern Baker County.

It’s not clear what that lone wolf is up to. But fortunately ODFW knows where he is, because biologists put a GPS collar on the wolf in March 2013. And the Snake River pack, unlike the new, unnamed pack, is a confirmed livestock killer, having killed one cow and injured two others in Wallowa County last fall.

The sooner ODFW can keep tabs on the newest wolf pack, the better.


Resort St. problems persist


We argued in 2012 that burying utility lines on Resort Street, though an attractive project, cost too many city dollars even when property owners along the street were going to contribute about $295,000 of what was then expected to be about a $1.1 million project.

Now some of those property owners contend they should pay less, or even nothing.

This would transform the Resort Street project from a mistake into a boondoggle that residents will be paying for in dollars, and possibly in extra potholes, for many years.

Every dollar trimmed from the property owners’ tab must be made up from city coffers. And we believe the city has already spent enough public dollars on this project.


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