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Home arrow News arrow Obituaries arrow Obituaries for the week of May 23 to May 27

Obituaries for the week of May 23 to May 27

Marjorie Erskine

Marjorie Erskine, 83, a longtime Baker City resident, died April 22, 2005, in Grants Pass at Three Rivers Community Hospital.

Her graveside memorial service will be at 3 p.m. Friday at Mount Hope Cemetery. There will be a reception afterward in the Oregon Trail Room of the Rodeway Inn, 810 Campbell St. Marjorie will be interred next to her husband Wayne E. Erskine, who died in December 2000.

Marjorie was born on July 25, 1921, at Stuart, Iowa. She married Wayne Erskine on June 8, 1941. Marjorie enjoyed her family and many friends.

She was an avid book reader and loved working crossword puzzles, fishing, gardening and baking her famous chocolate chip cookies. She also enjoyed sports, playing pool and being a member of the Sumpter Women's Club.

Marjorie was the treasurer for the Baker City Pool and Shuffleboard Association for several years. Most of all, Marjorie will be remembered for her smile and love of life.

Survivors include four children, Karen L. (Erskine) and Joe Jaramillo of Grants Pass, Bob and Carmen Erskine of Baker City, Chris and Rhoda Erskine of Newhall, Calif., and Jim and Beverly Erskine of Whitebird, Idaho; grandchildren, Margie Hartman, Susie Jaramillo, Marty Jaramillo, Lori (Erskine) Curtis, Bob Erskine Jr., Chris John Erskine, Wesley Erskine, and Codi Eckert; stepgrandchildren Brian, Brandon, and Shawn; great-grandchildren, Matt Roden, Bre', Ashley and Alexa Jaramillo, Katie Stout, Kristen, Kim and Kyle Curtis and Aiden Erskine; sisters, Gladys Robinson and Dorothy Rich, and a brother, Howard Arrasmith, all of California.

She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Wayne; a sister, Pauline Caldwell; and a brother, Donald Arrasmith.

Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Association or the Marjorie Erskine Memorial Trust through Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St., Baker City, OR 97814.

Ralph Rhea

Ralph Rhea, 78, a longtime Baker City resident, died May 20, 2005, at Providence Hospital in Portland, from complications of acute pancreatitis.

Visitations will be today until 5 p.m. at Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St. There will be a vigil service at 7 p.m. today at St. Francis de Sales Cathedral, First and Church streets.

Mass of Christian Burial will be at noon Friday at St. Francis de Sales Cathedral. The Most Rev. Thomas J. Connolly and the Rev. Robert C. Irwin will concelebrate the Mass. Vault interment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery. Honor Guard will be by the 4th Degree Knights of Columbus. There will be a luncheon reception at the church Parish Hall after the graveside service.

Ralph was born at John Day on Nov. 6, 1926, to Ralph and Stella Keerins Rhea. He was a descendent of an earlier homestead family, the Keerins, who built a home and began a long ranching business.

The Rhea family originally came to colonial America, settling in Tennessee. Family members included a prominent congressman. A county in Tennessee bears the family name (Rhea County).

Raised in Grant County, Ralph spent much of his childhood at the family homestead at Izee. At the age of 15 he moved with his family to Baker City. He was a Baker High School graduate.

After high school, Ralph enlisted in the U.S. Navy. He served in World War II and again in the Korean conflict.

He met Mary Frances Gibbons on the dance floor of the Covered Wagon Dance Hall outside Baker City in 1947. He proposed to Fran on Valentine's Day 1948, and they were married on Sept. 4, 1948, at St. Francis Cathedral. They raised three children and were married 51 years until Fran's death in 2001.

Ralph was employed by Pacific Northwest Bell from 1948 until 1982. He specialized in the installation of PBX systems.

He was instrumental in the building of the now-defunct Air Force Base on Beaver Mountain near Dooley Mountain and maintained the systems until the base closed. After his retirement from Pacific Northwest Bell, he opened his own telephone business, Rhea Communications, which ably served the many communities of Eastern Oregon. Much to the dismay of his loyal customers, he closed this business at the age of 73.

Ralph was a very generous individual who gave freely of his time and attention to his family, church and community. He cherished Eastern Oregon and enjoyed a good get-together with his many friends.

Ralph was well-known and treasured by everyone who took pleasure in his kindness, wit and warmth. Most of all, he was a loving husband, father, grandfather, and good friend.

Among his activities, he was a member of St. Francis de Sales Church and belonged to the Knights of Columbus Council where he served as financial secretary and grand knight. He was elected several times to be Oregon's representative for the Knights of Columbus national convention.

Additionally, Ralph was a member of the Baker Elks Lodge, Telephone Pioneers, Communications Workers of American, AFL-CIO; Boy Scouts of America; the American Legion; the Veterans of Foreign Wars; and the Baker Jaycees.

Ralph was a graceful and noted athlete who enjoyed sports competition his entire life. He and Fran won many trophies for their dancing skills. Ralph was such a good dancer that every woman, no matter the skill level, could magically whirl around the dance floor.

Ralph will be sorely missed and warmly remembered.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Fran; daughter Mary Elizabeth; parents, Ralph and Stella; brother, Bill; and sister, Rosemary.

Survivors include three children, Julie and her companion, Arthur Redman, of Portland, Daniel of Washington, D.C., and Patrick and his wife, Alana, and their three children, Adam, Sydnie, and Samantha of Vancouver, Wash.; his sister, Theda Boyer of Baker City; sisters-in-law, Eileen LaFay of Eagle, Idaho, and Barbara Jean Gibbons of Boise; brother and sister-in-law, Joe and Nancy Gibbons of Salinas, Calif.; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Knight's of Columbus local scholarship fund through Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St., Baker City, OR 97814.

‘Dottie' Mills

Doratha Mae "Dottie" Mills 76, of Baker City, died May 19, 2005, at her home.

There will be a family service later at Ft. Laramie, Wyo. She will be buried in Wyoming alongside her mother and sister.

She was born on Dec. 19, 1928, at Ft. Laramie, Wyo., to Orville E. and Doratha Knott Mills. She attended high school at Coos Bay and homesteaded at Big Piney, Wyo. She worked as a bartender in Sweet Home.

She had gardening and houseplant skills and loved smelling freshly turned earth ready for planting — anything. Food first if money is tight, then flowers if you can afford them. She always knew just what to grow where and what to fertilize it with and how to talk to it!

She had cooking skills and knew just how to make $5 a day stretch into some pretty good meals. How to look in the cupboard and "see" what to put together.

Where someone else saw a can of soup, she taught her children to make a meal for four. Her children are considered to be pretty good cooks and can set a nice table thanks to the endless hours they spent watching her whip something up.

They say they will never be able to make a sour cream raisin pie like she did, though. They say she was the best cook they ever knew. She knew how to let a cake cool before taking it out of the pan so it wouldn't just plop out and break apart, how to use seasonings, make "good" gravy, and how to determine what size pan to use. So many little details.

She knew how to hammer a nail or build almost anything from scrap wood. She knew how to fix things or at least knew what was needed to get it fixed, how to prime a water pump (after sliding down a big hill to a creek), coax a carburetor to get enough gas to start, how to jump-start a car, how to drive and be a good driver (a skill her children hope they have passed on to their kids, and especially how to drive a stick shift, even in reverse and into a back porch post, how to paint a wall, put up wallpaper and match the patterns. How to build and stake and keep a warm fire in a tiny little stove using ends of pallet wood.

She taught her family to use what they had and turn it into something else — to be able to look at something and know what it really was made for — but to see all of the other potential uses too.

She taught them to explore the world outside their houses, blocks, towns, cities, and countries. They love to travel and know where it comes from! They have learned years later that canned ravioli isn't so gross after all! How to fix up a vehicle to camp in (VW bus comes to mind) and how to set up a good camp and what to pack for camping.

They now hear Dave Brubeck playing "Take Five" and always think of her. They would not have an appreciation or true love of good music had their house not been filled with jazz, show tunes, and big band sounds.

Great movies like "Lawrence of Arabia," "Dr, Zhivago," or "The King and I" make them think of their mom. They will never forget the thrill she got when she saw Yul Brenner riding away on the back of the cart at the San Diego Zoo and he looked right at her! It was hot that day, but they thought their mom would melt right there in front of the zebras.

She taught them to be kind to all animals, and to always love the companionship and entertainment they provide as well as the trust and unconditional love they reward us with in return.

She also passed on the encouragement to be curious about the past generations of her family, and the love of history and to realize every generation has had its own set of hardships to face and soaring joys to celebrate.

She attempted to instill some type of religious belief. All parents think they are supposed to at least try, but her children are grateful she let them make their own decisions whether to pursue it or go another way. She gave them the right to choose and never forced it upon them.

She also taught them how to hang on for dear life when a horse tries to buck them off and how to get up, dust themselves off and climb back on when hanging on fails. She taught them how to say "thank you."

She taught them that astrology is really more than just the signs in the sky. She always had a feeling there was more than just a date behind dates. She was a true Sagittarian.

The most important gift she gave her children was their sense of having an independent spirit. The three girls were a fierce threesome for a while, and most of what they know comes from that period of time and has stayed with them the longest. They want their mom to know that they cherish their youthful innocence and rebellion, but now they rely on the things she taught them to really live. They have attained a thriving, mature sense of independence, and a spirit that will not fail them in the most troubling of times.

She was at times their friend, mentor, teacher, opposition, and conscience. Much loved, misunderstood, but theirs.

All of the words created fail to describe their gratefulness to her for all of the good and powerful things she gave them.

Survivors include her four children; 10 grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; and her longtime companion, Bud Beeson.

Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society through Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St., Baker City, OR 97814.

Sylvia Talich

Sylvia Talich, 95, of Phoenix, Ariz., a former longtime Baker City resident died May 23, 2005, at her home.

Her funeral will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Agape Christian Center at 650 Highway 7. Pastor Aaron Oglesbee of the Agape Christian Center will officiate. Burial will be at Mount Hope Cemetery.

Visitations will be from noon to 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Agape Christian Center.

She was born Sylvia Nelson on March 15, 1910, at Bristow, Neb. She lived on a farm on the Niabrera River and attended school at Bristow. When she was about 10, she was convinced that one of her classmates, Paul Talich, would someday be her husband when he conducted a funeral for a sparrow that had met an untimely death.

She and Paul were married on Dec. 21, 1936. Paul worked for the U.S. Forest Service, which meant that every promotion required a move to another part of the country, so they moved around quite a bit before settling at Baker City.

They were married at Vancouver, Wash., and lived at Corvallis. Soon after they were married, they moved to Ketchikan, Alaska, where among other things, she worked as a waitress at a local restaurant. She often said that she quit that job before she got fired.

The family next moved to Porterville, Calif., and then returned to Corvallis. Other moves took them to Pierce, Neb., Bend, Medford, John Day, back to Corvallis again, and then to Worcester, Mass., Athol, Mass., Hutchinson, Kan., and Lyons, Kan.

Their first son was born at Lyons in 1942. They then traveled to Riverside, Calif., Hemet, Calif., and Newman, Calif., where her second son, David, was born in 1944. One more move to Sisters and her family was complete with her third son, Bill, in April of 1956.

Her husband died in 1987. She remained in Baker City until 2003 when she moved to Phoenix to be closer to immediate family. Her three sons live at Kwajalien, Marshal Islands; Phoenix, Ariz.; and Clemmons, N.C.

Sylvia taught school at Muddy Creek and was a substitute teacher at Baker City and Durkee. She and Paul were very active in several churches including the Presbyterian, St. Stephens Episcopal, Foursquare and they were instrumental in starting the Agape Christian Center.

Survivors include three sons, six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Norman Huff

Norman Ernest Huff, 74, a longtime Pine Valley resident, died May 19, 2005, at his home.

There will be no service.

Norman was born in Oct. 1, 1930, at Baker City. He attended school at Port Ludlow, Wash., and in 1945 returned to Pine Valley with his family, where he graduated from high school. He completed his education with two years at Oregon Institute of Technology in Klamath Falls.

Norman served in the armed forces from Aug. 15, 1951, through Aug. 15, 1953. He also served at the White Sands Proving Ground in New Mexico and played baseball for the White Sands Rockets. Upon his discharge at the rank of corporal, he returned to Pine Valley where he bought the Richfield Service station, which he owned and operated for many years during the Brownlee and Oxbow dam-building era.

Norman married the love of his life, Velda Bunch, also a Pine Valley resident, on Jan. 22, 1955, in Baker, City. They had a daughter, Rhonda Lynn.

Norman and Velda recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.

After selling the service station, Norman began working as both a driver and mechanic for the Pine-Eagle School District, and later for Mid Columbia Buses, finally retiring and doing part-time work with his brother at the Pine Telephone Co.

Norman enjoyed hunting, and he was an avid fly fisherman. A lover of the outdoors, he enjoyed all aspects of it, including any type of yard work or landscaping. Wherever he was, he could be found in the constant company of his beloved dog, Abbie.

Survivors include his wife, Velda; his daughter, Rhonda; two younger brothers, Gaylon Huff of Grand Ronde, and Rodney Huff and his wife, Lorna, of Pine Valley; six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren; several nieces and nephews; and his favorite mother-in-law, June Freeman.

Norman was preceded in death by his father and mother, three aunts, two uncles, and numerous other family members.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Juvenile Bipolar Research Foundation or the charity of one's choice in care of Tami's Pine Valley Funeral Home, P.O. Box 543, Halfway, OR 97834.

John David McNair

John David McNair, 66, died May 19, 2005, after a lengthy illness.

He was born March 20, 1939, at Baker City, to John and Edith M. McNair. He joined the U.S. Navy during his senior year at St. Francis Academy. He was commissioned from the ranks, served on three ships and with the 1st Marine Division, but spent most of his time in California, where he retired at age 37.

While finishing college, he met and married Farrar A. Bresee. They moved to the wilderness in southern Illinois, designed and built an earth-sheltered house, and enjoyed a life full of art, music and books. Always an avid reader, especially of history, he compiled and published a family genealogy from his ancestors' days in Maryland, Ohio and Illinois, and westward to Oregon with sojourns in Iowa and Colorado.

To the delight of his wife, he could recite a love poem on bended knee and then sing a bawdy sea chantey while dancing a very dignified jig. Life was interesting and fun to Lt. McNair and it ended too soon. His many friends will miss his dry wit and keen insight.

Survivors include his wife of 25 years; three brothers, Mark G. of The Dalles, William N. of Portland, and Charles H. of Baker City; three married daughters; seven grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

He was preceded in death by his parents; his sisters, Barbara Joanne Devine Hughes, Audrey Hellene Bradley, and Janice Roselle Dowdy; and a younger brother, Daniel Scott.

After cremation, his remains will be placed in Arlington National Cemetery.

Daryl Whiteley

Daryl Earl Whiteley, 82, of Baker City, died May 14, 2005.

A celebration of Daryl's life and graveside memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at Pine Haven Cemetery in Halfway. Friends are invited to join the family for a reception after the service at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Hall in Halfway.

Daryl was born on July 26, 1922, to Earl Arthur and Ruby L. Mehlhorn Whiteley near Pine Town. He was raised in Halfway and graduated from Halfway High School in 1940. Daryl joined the National Guard when he was 17 and in September he was a part of the Rainbow 41st division and began training for battle.

Daryl received the Central Solomon's medal, the combat infantry badge, Guadalcanal medal and was also eligible for the Purple Heart but refused it. Daryl also received the Bronze Star on April 6, 2004, for his 11 months served in battle on Guadalcanal and New Georgia. He served in the U.S. Army for five years and 19 days.

Daryl married Carmen Whiteley on Dec. 22, 1945. They were married 57 years. During his life, they worked in many places. They spent a number of years in the livestock business and managed large cattle operations, which took them all over the Western states and Canada.

Daryl worked for MK Construction on the Oxbow and Brownlee dams in Oregon; and other construction jobs in Los Banos, Calif.; Green River, Wyo.; Libby, Mont.; and Hawaii.

Daryl was very involved in the community, he was a people person and was always willing to take on a project. He just recently was recognized for 4,000 hours by the Trail Tenders for his volunteerism to the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center. In 2001, he was recognized by the Baker Chamber of Commerce as Legacy Man of the Year.

He enjoyed going to the Friday night jam sessions in Baker City and traveling. Daryl will forever be remembered as a wonderful friend to many.

Survivors include his son, Larry, of Walla Walla, Wash.; granddaughters, Lehua Hansen of Pasco, Wash., Kuuipo Whiteley of Othello, Wash., and Heather Clark of Richland, Wash.; eight great-grandchildren; a brother, Lloyd "Bub" Whiteley of Halfway; niece, Jerri Kay Goodwin; and very special friend, Georgia Wells.

He was preceded in death by his parents; and his wife, Carmen.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Trail Tenders in care of Tami's Pine Valley Funeral Home, P.O. Box 543, Halfway, OR 97834.

‘Dick' Herman

Richard Louis "Dick" Herman, 61, of Baker City, died peacefully on May 22, 2005, at his home with his family at his side.

His funeral will be Wednesday at 2 p.m. at Gray's West & Co. Pioneer Chapel, 1500 Dewey Ave. Pastor Jon Privett of the First Nazarene Church will officiate. He will be buried at Mount Hope Cemetery next to his daughter, Dr. Suzanne Farebrother. Visitations will be today until 8 p.m. at Gray's West & Co.

Dick was born Dec. 13, 1943, at East Chicago, Ind. He was baptized and confirmed at St. John Lutheran Church in Calumet City, Ill. He was united in marriage to Nancy Lang at the same church on Aug. 4, 1962. They were elementary school sweethearts who met at Lincoln Elementary School in Calumet City.

Dick was a graduate of Thornton Fractional North High School and went on to college at the University of Illinois in Urbana, Ill. He worked at various companies such as: Simmons Co., International Paper Inc., Chromaly Electronics, Motorola, S&R Industries, and IBM, where he worked as a mechanical engineer/scientist. While at IBM he received five U.S. patents, wrote 12 technical publications and received many outstanding achievement awards. He retired from IBM in 1994 and started his own engineering business. He also worked in Baker City on architectural design plans on commercial and private buildings including: OTEC, Pioneer Bank, Stump Dodger Station, and several homes.

His favorite sport was fishing.

Dick is survived by his wife, Nancy; his daughters, Sheri and Dannielle; his son, Gregory; his brothers, Leslie and Robert; his sister, Janice; his brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Albert and Bernice; and by his daughter, Dr. Suzanne Farebrother, M.D.

Contributions in Dick's memory may be made to the University of Texas Medical Branch, Suzanne Farebrother Memorial, in care of Gray's West & Co., P.O. Box 726, Baker City, OR 97814.

Eleanor Van Winkle

Eleanor Van Winkle, 87, a former Baker City resident, died May 19, 2005, at her home in Indianola, Iowa.

Her graveside service will be Friday at 10 a.m. at Mount Hope Cemetery in Baker City, with Pastor Robin Harris officiating.

Eleanor was born April 28, 1918, in Baker City. She went to grade school at Rye Valley and graduated in 1936 from Vale High School. He earned an accounting degree from LaSalle Extension University in Chicago.

Eleanor was a welder in a shipyard during World War II. She worked as an accountant for Ore-Ida Frozen Foods for 25 years. In her spare time she was a farmer, 4-H leader, mechanic, seamstress, gardener and carpenter.

Eleanor was a faithful member of the Baker Valley Christian Assembly for 19 years, serving as a Deaconess, Sunday School teacher, Missionettes leader, Ladies Bible Study speaker and visitation ministry.

She was such a fun grandmother, doing cartwheels, backbends, splits and playing games and baseball with her grandchildren up into her 60s. She memorized several books of the Bible and could quote them to her grandchildren word for word.

She is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, Janis and John Hart of Indianola, and Virginia and Monty Thompson of La Grande; a sister, Mary Ellen Groen of John Day; five grandchildren: Wayne Hart and his wife, Donna, Kathy Stephenson and her husband, Clifford; Wanda Habecker and her husband, Pierre; Carla Bates and her husband, Gene; and Larkin Thompson; nine great-grandchildren: Eric Bates, Joel Hart and his wife, Carrie; Aaron Hart and his wife, Anna; Jason Hart, Dean Stephenson, Angela Stephenson, Shane Stephenson, Tausha Habecker and Clayton Habecker; and many cousins, nieces, nephews and friends.

Eleanor was preceded in death by two husbands, Wayne Staples and Harmon Van Winkle; her parents, Warren and Vera Powell; and a sister, Dorothy Cameron.

Norman Huff

Norman Ernest Huff, 74, a longtime Pine Valley resident, died May 19, 2005, at his home.

There will be no services.

Norman was born in Oct. 1, 1930, at Baker City. He attended school in Port Ludlow, Wash., and in 1945 returned to Pine Valley with his family, where he graduated from high school. He completed his education with two years at Oregon Institute of Technology in Klamath Falls.

Norman served in the armed forces from Aug. 15, 1951, through Aug. 15, 1953. He also served at the White Sands Proving Ground in New Mexico and played baseball for the White Sands Rockets. Upon his discharge at the rank of corporal, he returned to Pine Valley where he bought the Richfield Service station, which he owned and operated for many years during the Brownlee and Oxbow dam-building era.

Norman married the love of his life, Velda Bunch, also a Pine Valley resident, on Jan. 22, 1955, in Baker, City. To this union a daughter was born, Rhonda Lynn.

Norman and Velda recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.

After selling the service station, Norman began working as both a driver and mechanic for the Pine-Eagle school district, and later for Mid Columbia Buses, finally retiring and doing part-time work with his brother at the Pine Telephone Company.

Norman enjoyed hunting, and he was an avid fly fisherman. A lover of the outdoors, he enjoyed all aspects of it, including any type of yard work or landscaping. Wherever he was, he could be found in the constant company of his beloved dog, Abbie.

He is survived by his wife, Velda; his daughter, Rhonda; two younger brothers, Gaylon Huff of Grand Ronde, and Rodney Huff and his wife, Lorna, of Pine Valley; six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren, several nieces and nephews, and his favorite mother-in-law, June Freeman.

Norman was preceded in death by his father and mother; three aunts, two uncles, and numerous other family members.

Contributions in Norman's memory may be made to The Juvenile Bipolar Research Foundation or the charity of your choice in care of Tami's Pine Valley Funeral Home, P.O. Box 543, Halfway, OR 97834.

‘Tina' Spivey

Ernestina "Tina" Spivey, 78, a longtime Baker City resident, died May 19, 2005, at her home surrounded by her family.

Her funeral will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Church of the Nazarene, 1250 Hughes Lane. Interment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery. There will be a Celebration of Life potluck afterward at the Spivey-Bjorklund home at 2840 Fourth St.

Ernestina Gomez y Quinones was born on Dec. 23, 1926, at Aquadilla, Puerto Rico, to Francisco Gomez y Blas y Providencia Quinones y Hernandez. She lived at Aquadilla until relocating to the United States in 1946 after meeting her future husband, Claude R. Spivey.

He returned to Oregon after his discharge from the service. She flew to New York where she worked and lived with her aunt while waiting for him to return. They had met while he was stationed at Ramey Air Force Base in Puerto Rico during World War II.

After their marriage on July 5, 1947, they traveled for three days and three nights by train from New York City to Baker City where they would make their home for the next 58 years until her death.

Tina loved her family deeply. She was a loving wife, mother and a great friend to many. Although Tina was of small stature, her heart was filled with unconditional love for the many lives she touched. She will be missed by all who knew her.

Survivors include her husband, Claude R. Spivey; children, Diana Lynn "Deany" Hayes and her husband, Phil, of Grand Junction, Colo., Linda May Bjorklund and her husband, Bill, of Baker City, and Evelynn "Suzi" Spivey and her friend, Gene Solem, of Gresham and Ron Spivey and his wife, Ann, of Baker City; her grandchildren, Shane and Sheri Hayes, Kirk and Stella Hayes, Jason and Nancy Hayes, Travis Mason, Rachael and David Wasley, Heather Morgan, Misty and Michael Kuhl, Shakira Hester-Close, April and Bob Felix, Jamie Bjorklund, Shiloh and Wendy Bronson, Dusty and Jen Spivey, Lyndsie Spivey and fiance, Brian Williams, and Holly Spivey; great-grandchildren, Jen, Adam, Justin, Makayla, Isaac, Lucas, Nico, Destiny, Cody, Britnay, Korina, Taylor Julia, Jane, CJ, Aidan, Ailah, Anoah, Aeris, Weston, Luke, Taylor May, Jerod, Lindsey, Shiloh II, John Eric, Carol Ann and Chad; her aunt, Carmen Varela of California; two sisters, Mercedes "Chele" and her husband, Hector De Soto of Puerto Rico and Angelica Gonzalez of New York; and many nieces, nephews and cousins.

She was preceded in death by her parents; brothers, Wilfredo Gomez, Luz "Lucy" Hamlin, Blanca Gomez, Francisco Gomez Jr., Rafael Gomez, and Luis Gomez.

The "Window of Reflection," memory window is on display at 1719 Main St., next to Elkhorn Title Co.

Memorial contributions may be made to Pathway Hospice through Tami's Pine Valley Funeral Home, P.O. Box 543, Halfway, OR 97834.

 
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