In the dark on wolves

By Jayson Jacoby, The Baker City Herald

So far as is known, Oregon's newest wolf pack hasn't attacked any livestock.

But this pack, which apparently consists of five wolves, is in one respect the most worrisome group of wolves in the state.

The reason is that nobody knows where they are.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) hopes to ease that concern, as soon as possible, by netting at least one of the wolves and fitting it with a GPS collar that emits a signal by which agency officials can track the wolf's movements and, by extension, the pack's.

That knowledge is vital in helping ODFW alert livestock owners when wolves are nearby.

We were reminded of this just this week, when an adult male wolf from the Snake River pack wandered west into northern Baker County.

It's not clear what that lone wolf is up to. But fortunately ODFW knows where he is, because biologists put a GPS collar on the wolf in March 2013. And the Snake River pack, unlike the new, unnamed pack, is a confirmed livestock killer, having killed one cow and injured two others in Wallowa County last fall.

The sooner ODFW can keep tabs on the newest wolf pack, the better.

The Baker City Herald
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