Letters to the Editor for March 17, 2014

By Baker City Herald readers March 17, 2014 08:22 am

We need to reconsider our futile war on drugs

With respect to the dangers of addictive drug usage we need to have a COMPLETE discussion and evaluation regarding the damage they do versus the damage and cost associated with our present attempts at forced drug control. This analysis must include the total cost, which would include the dollar cost of prisons, drug control agencies, nation-wide associated local police force expenditures, and related costs. To this must be added the human costs which include incarcerating otherwise productive people and the lifelong emotional impact on children whose parent or sibling are serving prison time.  

Youth appear to be attracted to drugs for two main reasons. One is because drug use is forbidden and therefore exciting. The other is because there is profit in getting an acquaintance “hooked” on drugs in order to help support one’s own habit. All attempts to stop the use of drugs by force of law will merely assure greater profits for the pushers. This fact appears to be ignored by those responsible for our present drug laws.

Our government tells us we live in the freest country in the world. Yet the United States has a greater percentage of its population in prison than any other nation. Nearly half of those prisoners are locked up merely for violating our drug laws. We are using taxpayers’ money to build more prisons so we can incarcerate even more mothers, fathers and youth for violations of futile drug laws. 

Internationally the attempt to control drug movement has turned our southern border into a war zone! Gangs are killing each other for supremacy and many innocent people are slaughtered as well. This bloodshed is a direct result of our futile attempt to control drug usage in this country and Mexico obviously knows it. 

In addition to the great economic cost the many years of our attempt at forced control of drugs has caused untold misery and ruined lives and deaths, while producing no measurable benefit. Is it not time for reasonable people to seek a less hostile policy that is compatible with our free country?

Jasper Coombes

Haines

People need to pay for what they want

Here we go again. I noticed in last night’s paper two non-related stories of citizens wanting someone else to pay for their purchase.

First of all, to address Suzanne Fouty wanting to add 50 cents per month to our water/sewer bills for the spay/neuter program. I want to say at the outset your program is admirable and does good work but, I am so tired of my utility bill being looked at as a piggy bank for something other than water/sewer. The key word is utility bill; I don’t agree with the city adding $1 per month for sidewalks to it, let alone money for spay/neuter and a part-time coordinator’s salary. Apply to the Leo Adler for help or other charitable organizations, have fundraisers, raise the fee you charge for adoption, be creative in seeking funds, but don’t look at my utility bill as a piggy bank. I do take issue with Fouty saying how I feel about 50 cents reflects on how I feel about animals. We had a cat adopt us 11 years ago and she is the joy of our lives; our love for animals is not an issue.

Secondly, I would like to address the Resort Street property owners who don’t want to pay for what they ordered. We live on 11th Street, which was paved in 1980 — no curbs, no sidewalks, no underground utilities, no fancy metal framework to hide our garbage cans behind, and it was assessed at $7 per foot to the property owners. Now fast forward 1/3 of a century, pave a street, beautiful new sidewalks, underground utilities, fancy metal framework hiding your garbage containers and you don’t think you should pay anything? Come on now, you are business owners; we used to have a café downtown. If you came in and ordered a meal, you better believe you wouldn’t leave until you paid for it. Just as you won’t give me a new car for my birthday and my wife a diamond necklace for hers. Now you know, you ordered the steak, now pay for it.

Bill Ward

Baker City

Reminded again why Baker is a great place to live

To Virginia Kostol, who found my money and turned it over to Shannon Kanyid, who got it to me: I thank both of you very much, providing once again Baker is a great place to live.

Tom Hank

Baker City

Sticking up for the venerable VHS tape and the VCR

If you need further proof that our technology actually peaked in the 1980s, I present to you the much-maligned VHS tape.

I currently watch VHS tapes that were manufactured in the late 1970s and early 80s on a VHS machine made not long after. Thirty-five years later and they play just fine.

From an archival standpoint, a VHS tape will last 100+ years if kept cool and dry. Each cassette is a marvel of wheels, pins and magnetic tape. By contrast, a DVD or Blu-Ray is a cheap 15-cent plastic disc that has a shelf life of two to five years. If you have children, make that two to five months. If they are toddlers, it’s more like two to five minutes. One lateral scratch on the label or playing-side and your favorite movie is finished.

Libraries all over the country are replacing the best archival video format they have in favor of an inferior knock-off that will render their entire archive obsolete in just a few years. That means, in order to preserve our national film heritage, a library will have to consistently replace their most popular titles, over and over and over again.

Consumers are being duped into doing the same thing.

Troubleshooting a VCR and/or VHS tape usually requires nothing more than some alcohol, Q-tips, a pair of scissors, some scotch tape and a little patience. Troubleshooting a DVD or Blu-Ray player and/or disc means buying a new DVD or Blu-Ray player and/or disc. This is madness.

If you want a film heritage you can actually pass on to your children, then pony up the 50 cents to a dollar and save a VHS today.

Oh, and the best part: I can still fast-forward through the commercials. Can you?

MH Heintz

Baker City