Shelter in place. Lockdown. Quarantine.

Whatever you call it, it’s been a few months since the COVID-19 pandemic taught us what staying home for an extended period of time actually looks and feels like.

Although things are unpredictable right now, we can control our ability to emerge from this challenge differently than we entered it.

Here are three pieces of money advice you can apply to your bank account, budget and lifestyle as life evolves after lockdown.

Prepare for an emergency

Financial experts believe this pandemic has illuminated the need for emergency funds and cash reserves.

“Financial advisers for years, I think, with a lot of people, could talk until they’re blue in the face about why an emergency fund is a good idea,” said Kevin Mahoney, CFP, founder of Illumint, a virtual financial firm based in Washington, D.C. “But for people who were fortunate to have not actually experienced an unexpected medical event, a long-term job loss, whatever it might be, it can be hard to really convince people that this is a top priority for their money.”

Now, job losses, furloughs and medical emergencies have provided tangible examples of why these funds are so important.

The general rule for an emergency fund is to have three to six months’ worth of living expenses saved. That may or may not be enough, depending on the circumstances. If you’re able, save something now. Even $500 is a good start.

Prepare, don’t panicEmergency readiness will likely also extend to home pantries. For better or worse, when frenzy sets in, consumers begin panic shopping. Americans have seen the repercussions of that firsthand — disinfecting wipes are still difficult to come by.

Forward-thinking consumers will likely begin to accumulate a reasonable amount of essential supplies or stock an emergency kit in case they’re ever again unable to leave the house for an extended period of time.

“Consumers will adopt a mindset of ‘sufficient stockpiling’ as their awareness of life’s uncertainties has been magnified due to COVID-19,” Ross Steinman, professor of consumer psychology at Widener University in Pennsylvania, said in an email.

While there’s no need to hoard, it may be beneficial to prepare in case other people once again panic shop for food and essentials at the onset of future emergencies.

You may want to employ savvy shopping strategies for those necessary items that you’ll continue to buy. That may include purchasing bulk quantities at a lower price per unit, using products more sparingly or applying online coupons in an attempt to save money.

Shift spendingMonthly expenses will likely also look different moving forward. Mahoney believes the stay-at-home orders have acted as a budget reset for many.

But for months now, most people have been left with no choice other than to stop traveling, dining out, attending concerts and going to the movie theater. Budgets have therefore skipped over expenses that used to be recurring.

Some of these new routines might stick even when life regains some sense of normalcy. If these do stick, it’s possible you’ll spend less discretionary money in the months ahead than you did before the pandemic began.

Through all three of these lessons, it’s clear living through a pandemic has served as an impetus to raise awareness about financial preparedness.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.