50 YEARS AGO

from the Democrat-Herald

November 20, 1970

Forest Service workers should complete by Thursday the resurfacing of the bottom of the swimming area at Union Creek Campground, said Baker District ranger Art Schimke today. It is the first stage in improving swimming facilities at Phillips Lake.

25 YEARS AGO

from the Baker City Herald

November 20, 1995

Forty-three employees from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s Baker Resource Area returned to work this morning after missing four days last week because of the partial federal government shutdown.

10 YEARS AGO

from the Baker City Herald

November 19, 2010

Haines voters have elected Dennis Anthony as the city’s mayor in a race that could not have been closer.

Literally.

Anthony, who is a Haines city councilor, defeated incumbent Mayor Connie Pound by a single vote — 95 to 94.

The margin was so close that it prompted an automatic recount of the ballots by hand, County Clerk Tami Green said. The results were identical to the tally from the county’s ballot-counting machine.

ONE YEAR AGO

from the Baker City Herald

November 20, 2019

Recycling remains a challenge in Baker County, but a proposed test project could turn some types of trash into compost rather than burying it in the landfill.

David Henry, president of Baker Sanitary Service, said the recycling situation has been relatively stable for the past year or so.

But that comparative tranquility followed a period of upheaval during which Baker Sanitary, which owns both a recycling center in Baker City and the county’s major landfill about five miles southeast of town, stopped accepting certain types of plastic containers (September 2017) and mixed paper (December 2018) at the recycling center at 12th and Campbell streets.

In both cases the issue was China’s decision to stop importing those materials from the U.S.

The lack of domestic buyers for those recyclables forced Baker Sanitary, and many other garbage collectors across the state and nation, to start burying the materials in landfills instead.

That hasn’t had a major effect on Baker Sanitary’s landfill, Henry said, since plastics and mixed paper constitute relatively small volumes.

Although the tonnage of trash disposed of at the company’s landfill increased by 11.6% in 2017 — from 12.43 tons in 2016 to 14.10 tons — Henry said the increase was due more to a busy construction market, which produces considerable amounts of garbage.

The reduction in recycling of plastics didn’t have a large effect since it started toward the end of 2017.

“We haven’t noticed a substantial effect at the landfill” due to the inability to accept the plastics and paper products at the recycling center, Henry said.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.